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Old     (jdiaz78)      Join Date: Sep 2014       05-04-2015, 11:58 AM Reply   
I went out yesterday to learn how to drive my new boat. I used to have a jet boat, so there is a considerable difference in driving styles as it had a twin engine. My problem I was having is going straight in reverse. It only seemed to want to back towards the starboard side. I know this is from the way the prop spins, but there has to be a way to back it straight. I was getting frustrated with it and stopped before I got too mad.

I tried having the wheel cranked in the opposite direction with some thrust and that didn't help. I even tried to feather the prop thinking that was the proper way. Any tips would be great. I tried searching the forum and didn't see anything that popped out at me.

Thanks
Old     (volzalum)      Join Date: May 2009       05-04-2015, 12:03 PM Reply   
It's a stop and go method, backing up will turn you, have the rudder set so when you engage in forward it will bump the rear back out towards straight. Then use the method of reverse for speed and forward to keep tracking straight.
Old     (jarrod)      Join Date: May 2003       05-04-2015, 12:06 PM Reply   
Not going to happen.

The best you can do is turn the wheel right to swing the stern to the left, and then straighten out the wheel and click reverse. The momentum of the rear swinging left will allow you to back up a short distance straight, at which point you need to repeat that process over again.
Old     (TomH)      Join Date: Jan 2014       05-04-2015, 12:47 PM Reply   
What they ^^ said. Once you get used to it though, you'll find work-arounds and also be able to use it to your advantage, especially docking on the starboard.
Old     (downfortheride)      Join Date: Jun 2005 Location: SLC, UT 5600'       05-04-2015, 1:18 PM Reply   
Welcome to an inboard, you will get used to the Starboard backing in no time.
Old     (tyler97217)      Join Date: Aug 2004       05-04-2015, 2:23 PM Reply   
You just need to get used to it. That is the way it is, like everyone has said. You will learn to either turn around in the stall as you drop in or you will learn to bump the gas forward and turn the wheel to straighten you out.... repeat. repeat. repeat...
Once you get used to it you will be a pro. Comes second nature, like riding a bike.
Old     (john211)      Join Date: Aug 2008       05-04-2015, 3:32 PM Reply   
it's the nature of the beast.

I like the side thrust in reverse. Mine's port. Generally I aim my boat at about 30 degree angle to the fuel dock on the port side. One quick burst in reverse, and the boat lays up to a stop parallel to the dock just inches away.

Threading forwards through a Rube Goldberg course at low speeds will likely always remain a challenge.
Old     (DenverRider)      Join Date: Feb 2013       05-04-2015, 9:35 PM Reply   
Don't be afraid to hop out when you are loading to maneuver the boat manually into position to hook the winch. I've seen tons of newbies spend all day trying to get it lined up perfectly by going forward and backward. Practice the maneuver when people aren't waiting for you (and no doubt making you nervous). Sometimes you just have to get your feet wet. If you haven't been wet already by the time you're loading onto the trailer then what were you doing with a wake boat all day? When you pull up next to a dock, try to pick the side that your boat pulls toward so that you can come in slowly at a slight angle, goose the throttle in reverse, and this will suck the boat toward the dock.
Old     (denverd1)      Join Date: May 2004 Location: Tyler       05-05-2015, 10:17 AM Reply   
learn to use the boat's natural tendency to spin to your advantage. you can click into fwd then reverse and repeat and you will get a natural rotation to one side. use its tendency to spin when around close quarters at the marina, loading to trailer, etc.

That may mean rotating 270* to make a 90* turn. trust me, 270* the way it wants to go is always easier than making the 90* turn the way it doesn't want to

Last edited by denverd1; 05-05-2015 at 10:20 AM.
Old     (jdiaz78)      Join Date: Sep 2014       05-05-2015, 10:21 AM Reply   
Thanks for the tips, When I go back out on Sunday, I'll see how it goes. I have to load it onto my lift each time and love that all the people get to watch me screw it up.
Old     (volzalum)      Join Date: May 2009       05-05-2015, 10:24 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdiaz78 View Post
Thanks for the tips, When I go back out on Sunday, I'll see how it goes. I have to load it onto my lift each time and love that all the people get to watch me screw it up.
For lift lining up, get a little further away and then turn and maintain a little more speed. It's much easier to turn/adjust trajectory moving slightly faster than you'd think.
Old     (denverd1)      Join Date: May 2004 Location: Tyler       05-06-2015, 10:08 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by volzalum View Post
For lift lining up, get a little further away and then turn and maintain a little more speed. It's much easier to turn/adjust trajectory moving slightly faster than you'd think.
hmm. directional change come from pushing water across the rudder. I click it in and out of Fwd to keep the boat responding to slight changes in rudder angle. Speed = a wrecked rub rail at best, gelcoat damage if you miss the rail. If you can't pop in Rev to quickly stop yourself, you're going too fast.
Old     (dyost)      Join Date: Jan 2007       05-06-2015, 12:55 PM Reply   
John, I think I saw you out last Sunday? Are you the white/blue A24 on the lift by the ramp at Little Platte?
Beautiful rig if so.

I am the older Blue supra. I'll stop by next time I see you out and introduce myself.
Old     (john211)      Join Date: Aug 2008       05-06-2015, 1:12 PM Reply   
I too think that, the advice to 'speed up' when trying to dock your boat on a lift sounds like ... something on the order of reckless.

Take heart. There has ... for a long time ... been a learning curve for mastering inboard side thrust at low speeds, as this other forum shows ... even for very experienced boaters.

http://www.chriscraftcatalinaclub.co...-screw-inboard

Also, the Bob Armstrong book mentioned, "Getting Started in Powerboating," is copyright 1995. I've read it just for enjoyment. It's a good read. A lot of his book deals with offshore boating, which is interesting stuff in itself.

Side thrust at cruising speeds ... with plenty of water moving past the rudder ... is a product of different dynamics.
Old     (jdiaz78)      Join Date: Sep 2014       05-06-2015, 2:09 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by dyost View Post
John, I think I saw you out last Sunday? Are you the white/blue A24 on the lift by the ramp at Little Platte?
Beautiful rig if so.

I am the older Blue supra. I'll stop by next time I see you out and introduce myself.
That was me and thanks. Are you docked out at Paradise Point? I have seen a few wake boats out there. I'll be out there again on Sunday trying to figure this big old boat out.

Thanks again from everyone else, I'm sure the tips will help when I get back out there.
Old     (volzalum)      Join Date: May 2009       05-06-2015, 2:14 PM Reply   
I'm not saying for the OP to hit it at high speed. "Slightly faster" is compared to the I/O he is used to. With an I/O, he is used to turning the boat sharply from a stop. With an inboard you have to be moving. My rub rail and gel are not damaged, and I do not make contact with my guide posts while loading on the trailer. But I also trailer it with slightly more speed than an I/O. I can easily stop it with reverse thrust at the speeds I trailer and dock.
Old     (john211)      Join Date: Aug 2008       05-06-2015, 2:19 PM Reply   
I've said before, trailering is simple. You have a whole shoreline extending left and right in front of you to keep off of and to get your angle correct, no matter what the wind and current. Conversely, some approaches to slips in tight marinas were designed by designers who ... if they were boaters at all ... were certainly not inboard owners.
Old     (dyost)      Join Date: Jan 2007       05-06-2015, 6:52 PM Reply   
John, no I don't dock on the lake I store in my garage and trailer over from Platte City.

If you need someone to test out the wake (wakeboarding) on that bad boy I can help you out : )
Old     (dyost)      Join Date: Jan 2007       05-06-2015, 7:52 PM Reply   
Hey I can help show you how the handling works too if you like. Inboards can be tricky if you haven't driven one, someone to show you how to do it makes all the difference.

A 24ft boat is also more of a challenge than a 20/21 ft boat too.

Email me at:
dustin.m.yost@gmail.com
if you ever wanna hook up out on the lake

I'm gonna plan to get out this weekend also but looks like might be rainy the whole time.

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